Harkive 2013 – The Numbers

Harkive returns on Tuesday 15th July 2014 to take another worldwide look at what it means to be a music fan in the fast changing digital world.

After an astonishing response to the first running of the project in July 2013, when over 2,500 entries were submitted and the project received worldwide attention, Harkive will once again attempt to mobilise music fans across the globe on a single day by inviting them to submit and share the story of how, where and why they listen to music on 15th July.

Before we begin the process of building up to Harkive 2014, I thought it might be a good idea to give you an overview of the headline numbers for 2013.

The success of the project last year was beyond my expectations. Harkive really, really took off on 9th July last year and I have many people to thank for that. We received coverage in a wide variety of media outlets, including NME, Popjustice, BBC Radio 3 and Hypebot, and at one stage around 11am (GMT), harkive managed to become the number 1 trending topic on Twitter in the UK!

So, here is a quick overview of the 2013 numbers.

On 9th July 2013, 3498 tweets were sent with the #harkive hashtag, from 1152 different Twitter accounts. Approximately 10.6% of these tweets (371) were sent from the Harkive Twitter account, 234 of which were retweets of others’ tweets. In total there were 972 retweets, meaning that 2392 tweets were sent by individuals either contributing to, or talking about, Harkive.

This activity was mirrored over on the Harkive site, which had 3245 unique visitors (82% of which were new on the day) from 57 different countries, with interest in the site peaking at around 11am GMT with over 700 visitors in an hour. There was a similar story over on Facebook, with posts on the Harkive page achieving views in the high hundreds and gathering many shares and likes, whilst ‘Likes’ of the Harkive page increased by 107 to 250 on 9th July and peaked at 266 in the days that followed.

Once the dust had settled and the window closed on 16th July, a total of 1393 people had contributed to Harkive 2013, generating 2698 separate entries over the 11 different methods available. The table below shows the number of contributors per method, then total contributions per method.

88.7% of responses (2392) were received via Twitter, making it the most successful element of the project in terms of numbers, with the average Twitter contributor making 2.07 submissions to the project.

Removing Twitter from the equation and looking at the remainder as a whole, of the non-Twitter responses Email (14.4%) and submissions via the form on the Harkive site (31.4%) represented a solid response, and in addition these submissions took the form of longer pieces, with almost all respondents providing over 200 words and a good degree of detail.

Excluding Twitter, email, 3rd party sites and submissions via the Harkive site, the rest of the available services performed relatively poorly, in particular Facebook, which had been a successful channel during the promotional phase.

Here’s hoping for a similarly impressive response in 2014!

Thanks to everyone who contributed, or helped to spread the word. Let’s do it all again on 15th July.

The Harkive 2013 window closes tomorrow

Thank you to everyone who has so far submitted stories. What an amazing response!

If you haven’t told Harkive your story yet you still have just over 24 hours to get it to us. There are a number of ways you can do this, all of which are detailed on the How To Contribute page.

The window on Harkive 2013 will close at midnight (GMT) tomorrow, 16th July, and after that we will stop collecting stories. Later this week we’ll announce the winners of the Harkive prize draw. Shortly after some initial figures about the response will be posted, so stay tuned.

If you have any questions please feel free to email info@harkive.org

Thank you again!

 

Thank you!

It has just gone midnight in Hawaii, which means that the 9th of July 2013 is now history. What do you know? The world was listening!

Over 1000 stories have so far been submitted, and they are still coming in. Over 4000 tweets were sent, and other submissions arrived via email, Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, and elsewhere online. Almost 6000 people, in 68 countries, visited the site yesterday.  I’ve been genuinely overwhelmed with the response. Thank you to everyone who contributed. You have made Harkive a huge success.

If you haven’t contributed yet, you’ve got until 16th July to get your story in. After that the window for Harkive 2013 will close and the winners of the Harkive draw will be announced. I’ll shortly begin the process of making sense of it all and will be posting some initial findings in due course, so stay tuned.

Shall we do it all again next year? My plan is for Harkive to return again in 2014, and every year after that, so I do hope you’ll join in once more.

This project was my idea, and I’m currently getting a lot of plaudits and congratulations, which is lovely, but it really would not have been possible without the help of many, many other people. If you would indulge me for a second, I’d like to say Thank You to them.

To my wife, Valerie, who has put up with me tearing my hair out and worrying that Harkive would be an abject failure for many, many months. Thank you, honey!

Paul Meggs of Fumi Digital helped me put this site together. He also designed the lovely Harkive logo and made sure that the various other places where you can find Harkive online looked nice and hung together properly. Pete Ashton and Jon Hickman helped me understand how I was going to capture all of the information and stories that you have kindly provided. Stuart Harrison has also been involved with the planning for what happens with that information next.

Andrew Dubber, Dave Harte, Annette Naudin, Tim Wall, Paul Long, Jez Collins, and various other colleagues at BCU, have guided me through the entire process of the MA studies of which Harkive is the culmination. For listening to my ideas and providing feedback along the way: Thank you!

Duarte Romero Varela, Tori Widdowson, Gabriela Flinter, Max Kiyoshi and Yifan Wang kindly translated information about the project into various languages: Merci, Gracias, Danke!

Jude Rogers, Joe Muggs, Andrew Harrison, Rob Fitzpatrick, Laura Snapes, Steve McLay, Neil Codling, David Williams, Pete Ashton, Andrew Dubber and Clutch Daisy all provided example contributions in the run up to yesterday that really helped to make some sense of what I was trying to achieve. Thank you.

Thanks also to Mark Bowen (Wichita Recordings), Dave Stapleton (Edition Records), Rich Huxley (Hope and Social), Duncan Burns (The Glee Club), Andrew Campbell (LoJinx Recordings) and Geoff Dolman (Static Caravan), who all provided prizes for the Harkive draw. Thanks to Kyle Bylin of Sidewinder for allowing me to write a guest post for Hypebot that helped start the process of getting Harkive out to a wider audience.

Talking of which, Mark Venning, David Williams, The 1p Album Club, Anthony Bleach, Paul McGee and Joe Muggs all relentlessly retweeted about the project in the run up to yesterday. Thank you.

Many months ago, Karen Strunks (The 4am Project) & Ian Francis (Flatpack Festival) provided me with insights into what it’s like to plan a project that happens in a small window of time, and Robson Da Silva helped me understand the processes involved with software and user testing. They, along with Dave Harte and Andrew Dubber, helped me begin the process of planning this thing.

So, as you can see, this was far from a one-man operation. If I have forgotten anyone then I am truly sorry – It’s been a very long 48 hours! I’m going to take a break for today and watch some cricket. By a startling coincidence, I managed to plan Harkive for the day before the start of the Ashes series.

Thank you all, once again, you’ve been amazing!

Craig Hamilton

 

 

Good Morning to Honolulu….we’ve been waiting for you.

Today is the 9th July 2013, and this is the day that Harkive will be collecting stories from music fans around the world.

The aim of the project is to capture for posterity a global snapshot of the way in which we interact with the sounds and technology of today, and get to the essence of what music means to us as all.

We hope that it’s a beautiful morning there in Hawaii. We’ve been waiting for you.

One of the aims of Harkive has been to make contributing as easy as possible, which we hope we’ve achieved. For a little more detail on the different ways you can tell your story have a look at the How To Contribute page. Really, though, it’s very simple, and it breaks down like this:

- Just tell us the story of how, where and why you listen to music today.

- You can email your story to submit@harkive.org, or use the #harkive tag to post on social networks. You can also submit your story using the form on this site.

- If today is tricky for you, just make a few notes and send in your story at a later date. We’ll be accepting stories up until 16th July, when the Harkive window closes.

- Write as much or as little as you like: Send one tweet, or a hundred; write a two-line snapshot, or a very long essay – it’s entirely up to you.

- You can also take photos, record some audio, or even make a video.

- Remember that there are no right or wrong ways to do it, just tell us your story!

- …and here are our 5 reasons why we think you should contribute.

If you’re still a little stuck as to how you might contribute we’ve posted a number of example contributions from musicians, journalists and fans over the last few weeks. Take a scroll through the blog to get an idea of how others have Harkived their listening.

Happy Harkiving!

Good Morning to Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Seattle, Vancouver, Anchorage

Today is the 9th July 2013, and this is the day that Harkive will be collecting stories from music fans around the world.

The aim of the project is to capture for posterity a global snapshot of the way in which we interact with the sounds and technology of today, and get to the essence of what music means to us as all.

We hope that it’s a beautiful morning there in the USA and Canada, or anywhere else where the sun is rising in your part of the world.

One of the aims of Harkive has been to make contributing as easy as possible, which we hope we’ve achieved. For a little more detail on the different ways you can tell your story have a look at the How To Contribute page. Really, though, it’s very simple, and it breaks down like this:

- Just tell us the story of how, where and why you listen to music today.

- You can email your story to submit@harkive.org, or use the #harkive tag to post on social networks. You can also submit your story using the form on this site.

- If today is tricky for you, just make a few notes and send in your story at a later date. We’ll be accepting stories up until 16th July, when the Harkive window closes.

- Write as much or as little as you like: Send one tweet, or a hundred; write a two-line snapshot, or a very long essay – it’s entirely up to you.

- You can also take photos, record some audio, or even make a video.

- Remember that there are no right or wrong ways to do it, just tell us your story!

- …and here are our 5 reasons why we think you should contribute.

If you’re still a little stuck as to how you might contribute we’ve posted a number of example contributions from musicians, journalists and fans over the last few weeks. Take a scroll through the blog to get an idea of how others have Harkived their listening.

Happy Harkiving!

Good Morning to Chicago, Mexico City, Calgary, Caracas, Kingston

Today is the 9th July 2013, and this is the day that Harkive will be collecting stories from music fans around the world.

The aim of the project is to capture for posterity a global snapshot of the way in which we interact with the sounds and technology of today, and get to the essence of what music means to us as all.

We hope that it’s a beautiful morning there in the USA, Mexico, Jamaica, Canada, Venezuela, or anywhere else where the sun is rising in your part of the world.

One of the aims of Harkive has been to make contributing as easy as possible, which we hope we’ve achieved. For a little more detail on the different ways you can tell your story have a look at the How To Contribute page. Really, though, it’s very simple, and it breaks down like this:

- Just tell us the story of how, where and why you listen to music today.

- You can email your story to submit@harkive.org, or use the #harkive tag to post on social networks. You can also submit your story using the form on this site.

- If today is tricky for you, just make a few notes and send in your story at a later date. We’ll be accepting stories up until 16th July, when the Harkive window closes.

- Write as much or as little as you like: Send one tweet, or a hundred; write a two-line snapshot, or a very long essay – it’s entirely up to you.

- You can also take photos, record some audio, or even make a video.

- Remember that there are no right or wrong ways to do it, just tell us your story!

- …and here are our 5 reasons why we think you should contribute.

If you’re still a little stuck as to how you might contribute we’ve posted a number of example contributions from musicians, journalists and fans over the last few weeks. Take a scroll through the blog to get an idea of how others have Harkived their listening.

Happy Harkiving!

Good Morning to New York City, Rio De Janeiro, Buenos Aires, Montreal, Boston…

Today is the 9th July 2013, and this is the day that Harkive will be collecting stories from music fans around the world.

The aim of the project is to capture for posterity a global snapshot of the way in which we interact with the sounds and technology of today, and get to the essence of what music means to us as all.

We hope that it’s a beautiful morning there in the eastern US, Argentina, Brasil, Canada, or anywhere else where the sun is rising in your part of the world.

One of the aims of Harkive has been to make contributing as easy as possible, which we hope we’ve achieved. For a little more detail on the different ways you can tell your story have a look at the How To Contribute page. Really, though, it’s very simple, and it breaks down like this:

- Just tell us the story of how, where and why you listen to music today.

- You can email your story to submit@harkive.org, or use the #harkive tag to post on social networks. You can also submit your story using the form on this site.

- If today is tricky for you, just make a few notes and send in your story at a later date. We’ll be accepting stories up until 16th July, when the Harkive window closes.

- Write as much or as little as you like: Send one tweet, or a hundred; write a two-line snapshot, or a very long essay – it’s entirely up to you.

- You can also take photos, record some audio, or even make a video.

- Remember that there are no right or wrong ways to do it, just tell us your story!

- …and here are our 5 reasons why we think you should contribute.

If you’re still a little stuck as to how you might contribute we’ve posted a number of example contributions from musicians, journalists and fans over the last few weeks. Take a scroll through the blog to get an idea of how others have Harkived their listening.

Happy Harkiving!

Good Morning to Britain, Ireland, Portugal, Nigeria

Today is the 9th July 2013, and this is the day that Harkive will be collecting stories from music fans around the world.

The aim of the project is to capture for posterity a global snapshot of the way in which we interact with the sounds and technology of today, and get to the essence of what music means to us as all.

We hope that it’s a beautiful morning there in Britain, Ireland, Portugal, Nigeria, or anywhere else where the sun is rising in your part of the world.

One of the aims of Harkive has been to make contributing as easy as possible, which we hope we’ve achieved. For a little more detail on the different ways you can tell your story have a look at the How To Contribute page. Really, though, it’s very simple, and it breaks down like this:

- Just tell us the story of how, where and why you listen to music today.

- You can email your story to submit@harkive.org, or use the #harkive tag to post on social networks. You can also submit your story using the form on this site.

- If today is tricky for you, just make a few notes and send in your story at a later date. We’ll be accepting stories up until 16th July, when the Harkive window closes.

- Write as much or as little as you like: Send one tweet, or a hundred; write a two-line snapshot, or a very long essay – it’s entirely up to you.

- You can also take photos, record some audio, or even make a video.

- Remember that there are no right or wrong ways to do it, just tell us your story!

- …and here are our 5 reasons why we think you should contribute.

If you’re still a little stuck as to how you might contribute we’ve posted a number of example contributions from musicians, journalists and fans over the last few weeks. Take a scroll through the blog to get an idea of how others have Harkived their listening.

Happy Harkiving!

Good Morning to Rome, Oslo, Barcelona, Johannesburg, Paris

Today is the 9th July 2013, and this is the day that Harkive will be collecting stories from music fans around the world.

The aim of the project is to capture for posterity a global snapshot of the way in which we interact with the sounds and technology of today, and get to the essence of what music means to us as all.

We hope that it’s a beautiful morning there in Rome, Oslo, Barcelona, Johannesburg, Paris or anywhere else where the sun is rising in your part of the world.

One of the aims of Harkive has been to make contributing as easy as possible, which we hope we’ve achieved. For a little more detail on the different ways you can tell your story have a look at the How To Contribute page. Really, though, it’s very simple, and it breaks down like this:

- Just tell us the story of how, where and why you listen to music today.

- You can email your story to submit@harkive.org, or use the #harkive tag to post on social networks. You can also submit your story using the form on this site.

- If today is tricky for you, just make a few notes and send in your story at a later date. We’ll be accepting stories up until 16th July, when the Harkive window closes.

- Write as much or as little as you like: Send one tweet, or a hundred; write a two-line snapshot, or a very long essay – it’s entirely up to you.

- You can also take photos, record some audio, or even make a video.

- Remember that there are no right or wrong ways to do it, just tell us your story!

- …and here are our 5 reasons why we think you should contribute.

If you’re still a little stuck as to how you might contribute we’ve posted a number of example contributions from musicians, journalists and fans over the last few weeks. Take a scroll through the blog to get an idea of how others have Harkived their listening.

Happy Harkiving!

Good Morning Istanbul, Bucharest, Helsinki, Athens, Sofia

Today is the 9th July 2013, and this is the day that Harkive will be collecting stories from music fans around the world.

The aim of the project is to capture for posterity a global snapshot of the way in which we interact with the sounds and technology of today, and get to the essence of what music means to us as all.

We hope that it’s a beautiful morning there in Istanbul, Bucharest, Helsinki, Athens, Sofia or anywhere else where the sun is rising in your part of the world.

One of the aims of Harkive has been to make contributing as easy as possible, which we hope we’ve achieved. For a little more detail on the different ways you can tell your story have a look at the How To Contribute page. Really, though, it’s very simple, and it breaks down like this:

- Just tell us the story of how, where and why you listen to music today.

- You can email your story to submit@harkive.org, or use the #harkive tag to post on social networks. You can also submit your story using the form on this site.

- If today is tricky for you, just make a few notes and send in your story at a later date. We’ll be accepting stories up until 16th July, when the Harkive window closes.

- Write as much or as little as you like: Send one tweet, or a hundred; write a two-line snapshot, or a very long essay – it’s entirely up to you.

- You can also take photos, record some audio, or even make a video.

- Remember that there are no right or wrong ways to do it, just tell us your story!

- …and here are our 5 reasons why we think you should contribute.

If you’re still a little stuck as to how you might contribute we’ve posted a number of example contributions from musicians, journalists and fans over the last few weeks. Take a scroll through the blog to get an idea of how others have Harkived their listening.

Happy Harkiving!